<![CDATA[WE ARE FOR GLOBAL CHANGE ARE YOU? - NEWS]]>Sun, 15 Apr 2018 16:13:16 -0700Weebly<![CDATA[Climate change is wreaking havoc on delicate relationship between orchids and bees]]>Fri, 13 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/climate-change-is-wreaking-havoc-on-delicate-relationship-between-orchids-and-beesBy: Science Daily / Source: University of Sussex

Rising temperatures have wrecked a relationship, which relies on precision timing to succeed, between a rare orchid species and the Buffish Mining-bee which pollinates it.

Research led by Prof Michael Hutchings at the University of Sussex tracks how rising temperatures since the mid-17th century have wrecked a relationship, which relies on precision timing to succeed, between a rare orchid species and the Buffish Mining-bee which pollinates it.

Prof Hutchings, Emeritus Professor in Ecology, said the climate is changing so rapidly that the early spider orchid cannot respond effectively, leaving this species, and probably many other plants with highly specialized pollination mechanisms, facing the threat of severe decline and possible extinction.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[Carbon taxes could make significant dent in climate change, study finds]]>Thu, 12 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/carbon-taxes-could-make-significant-dent-in-climate-change-study-findsBy: David L. Chandler (MIT NEWS)

Putting a price on carbon, in the form of a fee or tax on the use of fossil fuels, coupled with returning the generated revenue to the public in one form or another, can be an effective way to curb emissions of greenhouse gases. That’s one of the conclusions of an extensive analysis of several versions of such proposals, carried out by researchers at MIT and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

What’s more, depending on the exact mechanism chosen, such a tax can also be fair and not hurt low-income households, the researchers report.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[Native Americans Fighting Fossil Fuels]]>Wed, 11 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/native-americans-fighting-fossil-fuelsBy: Tracey Osborne (Scientific American)

A historic number of Native Americans are running for political office this year in congressional, state legislative and gubernatorial races. Although candidates are running on a variety of platforms, candidates like Deb Haaland put the environment front and center. Haaland, who is making a bid for Congress in New Mexico, is committed to addressing climate change through a transition to 100 percent renewable energy. “The fight for Native American rights is also a fight for climate justice,” she said in an interview

In the U.S. Native American reservations represent only 2 percent of the land but hold approximately 20 percent of the country’s fossil fuel reserves, including coal, oil and gas. Together these fuels are worth some $1.5 trillion, according to the Council of Energy Resource Tribes. Whereas some have called for privatizing and exploiting native lands to unleash the economic potential of fossil fuels, many indigenous leaders from both the U.S. and other countries disagree with this approach.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[Here are all the ways climate change will ruin your flight]]>Tue, 10 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/here-are-all-the-ways-climate-change-will-ruin-your-flight​By: Kate Baggaley (Popular Science)

Flying is kind of a drag. There are plenty of routine hassles—the airport security lines, the cramped seats on the plane, the jet lag once you arrive at your destination—not to mention all the delays and cancellations you can’t predict.

And in coming years, air travel could become even more frustrating thanks to climate change. The jet stream is strengthening at high altitudes, which means that once you’re airborne, you’ll be more likely to encounter turbulence. And if you’re traveling from Europe to the United States—in other words, against the jet stream—your flight will probably take longer than today’s trips.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[Crisis Pregnancy Centers: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)]]>Mon, 09 Apr 2018 14:08:04 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/crisis-pregnancy-centers-last-week-tonight-with-john-oliver-hbo
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<![CDATA[Climate Change Threatens Bird Migrations, Habitats In San Diego County]]>Sat, 07 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/climate-change-threatens-bird-migrations-habitats-in-san-diego-countyBy Susan Murphy (KPBS)

San Diego is a stopover point along the the Pacific Flyway migration path that stretches from South America to Alaska. It’s a crisscross this time of year, with winter flocks returning north and spring birds just arriving. More than 520 species have been documented in the county — the most in the nation, but that number is expected to decline in coming years as climate change takes hold.

“I would say that every species in San Diego County could be threatened by climate change, said Phil Unitt, curator of birds and mammals at the San Diego Natural History Museum.

“Each species is going to be its own really complex story,” Unitt explained, as he walked along a path in the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge, using his special chirping call to attract nearby birds.

Unitt said annual migration patterns are being disrupted by rising temperatures, causing some species to seek new habitats that are wetter and cooler.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[Another Thing That Climate Change Takes From Us: Our Beaches]]>Fri, 06 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/another-thing-that-climate-change-takes-from-us-our-beachesBy: Claudia Geib (Futurism)

Poles without ice. Oceans without oxygen. Areas of the planet without people.
These are just some of the effects of a rapidly warming planet.
Add to the list: coasts without beaches.

You might assume this will happen sometime in the distant future, when sea levels rise. But it’s already happening. Climate change is taking beaches away from humans — in a physical way, as rising seas erode them, and in the way humans interact with them, as several governments have closed beaches to visitors to limit further damage.

Just this week, the Thai government announced that it was closing one of its most famous beaches for four months out of the year. Its rationale? To allow nearby coral reefs to recover from the effect of millions of visitors, which range from pollution to physical destruction from boats and human hands. And as the ocean grows warmer, stressed coral ecosystems like these recover more slowly from these intrusions.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[A Food Crisis and Climate Change]]>Thu, 05 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/a-food-crisis-and-climate-changeNEAL KENY-GUYER, PORTLAND, ORE. (New York Times - Opinion)

The world is facing one of the largest food crises in more than 70 years, and climate change is only making it worse. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change could kill an additional 250,000 people every year, from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress.

Three out of four people on earth rely on agriculture and natural resources to survive. For these people the effects of climate change — jeopardized water and food sources and increased competition for them — are a matter of life and death.

We must address the urgent effects of climate change through a combination of international action, national policies and strong local programs to build stronger, more resilient and more peaceful communities.

Read more here.
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<![CDATA[​Fiji PM: Climate change threatens our survival]]>Wed, 04 Apr 2018 12:30:00 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/fiji-pm-climate-change-threatens-our-survivalBBC NEWS

Fiji's prime minister has said the Pacific island nation is in "a fight for survival" as climate change brings "almost constant" deadly cyclones.

Frank Bainimarama comments came after Cyclone Josie caused deaths and flooding on Fiji's main island, Viti Levu, this past weekend.

"We are now at an almost constant level of threat from these extreme weather events," Mr Bainimarama said on Tuesday, adding that powerful cyclones in the region were becoming "more severe" as a result of climate change.

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<![CDATA[EPA Goes To War With California]]>Tue, 03 Apr 2018 15:17:35 GMThttp://forglobalchange.com/news/epa-goes-to-war-with-californiaBy Lauren Fix, Contributor for Forbes

Scott Pruitt announced on Monday that the aggressive fuel efficiency and emissions limits set under the Obama administration for model years 2022-2025 are 'not appropriate'.

Manufactures have been pressing the administration and the past administration to lower their standards. 

California is not going to take this lightly, they are ready for a fight. The State of California has had a special waiver under the 1970 Clean Air Act, which allowed them to enforce stronger air pollution standards than those of the federal government. 

Read more here.
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